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October 15 2013

surveyork
20:26
UNBELIEVABLE: Pro-surveillance Senators are trying to revive CISPA. Again! We've killed it twice before, we can do it again.

They really don't get it. 

Again and again the anti-privacy goons in Congress have circled the wagons to try and pass their favorite bill -- CISPA -- and again and again, we have completely shut them down. 

And yet, they're trying it again. Senators Diane Feinstein and Saxby Chambliss, leaders of the Senate Intelligence Committee and staunch defenders of the NSA mass surveillance, say they are "very close" to introducing a Senate version of CISPA.

CISPA would grant legal immunity to corporations who share your data with the NSA -- sign to the right to tell your Senators: NO CISPA.

April 24 2013

surveyork
20:15
Subject: Oppose CISPA

Last year, CISPA threatened to severely undermine existing privacy law by creating exemptions for companies who wanted to share sensitive user information with the government--including intelligence agencies like the NSA.

We must not sacrifice our fundamental civil liberties and rights to privacy in exchange for a misguided notion of 'cybersecurity.'
 
Please join me in defending online privacy by opposing CISPA.

via Tell your Senators: CISPA still doesn't protect our privacy | Demand Progress

February 20 2013

surveyork
01:58
CISPA was reintroduced in the House of Representatives. 

And the new bill has the very same dangerous problems as last year's version. CISPA 2.0 would grant immunity to private companies who share your data with other companies, private agencies, and the government. 
 
And CISPA permits the use of your personal data for reasons completely unrelated to cybersecurity. 

Now, as before, we cannot sacrifice our hard-won liberties and privacy rights in the pursuit of a misguided and overbroad conception of "security." 

We need your help.

February 14 2013

surveyork
10:53

CISPA is Back.

Dangerous Cybersecurity Legislation Threatens Online Privacy

The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA) is back. 

Last year, Representatives Rogers and Ruppersberger introduced CISPA, which would create a gaping new exemption to existing privacy law. CISPA would grant companies more power to obtain “threat” information (such as from private communications of users) and to disclose that data to the government without a warrant -- including sending data to the National Security Agency. 

This week, CISPA was reintroduced in the House of Representatives. EFF is joining groups like ACLU and Fight for the Future in combating this legislation.

November 01 2012

surveyork
03:32
In an interview with viEUws, the European Commissioner for Trade, Karel De Gucht, affirms that Europe wants to close the Canadian-European Trade Agreement (CETA) by the end of this year—which would have been today, since the European calendar year ends on October 31.1 CETA is a trade agreement designed to strengthen economic ties between Canada and the EU through “free” trade and increased investment. However, hidden within this treaty are intellectual property provisions that were essentially taken word-for-word from ACTA. And just like its close cousins, ACTA, KORUS, and TPP—and other trade agreements that are applauded by the entertainment industry for carrying expansive intellectual property provisions—CETA is being negotiated in secret.

October 23 2012

surveyork
12:23

October 17 2012

surveyork
21:43
surveyork
16:03
Paris, July 10th 2012 - A leaked version of the Canada-EU trade agreement (CETA) contains the worst parts of ACTA. The EU Commission appears to be once again trying to bypass the democratic process in order to impose ruthless repression online. Commissioner De Gucht cannot ignore the decision of the EU Parliament on ACTA. CETA must be cancelled altogether (or its repressive ACTA parts must be scrapped), or face the same fate as ACTA in the Parliament.
CETA, the Zombie ACTA, Must Face the Same Fate | La Quadrature du Net

October 11 2012

surveyork
06:21
Here it comes: After months of secret negotiations with the players who pushed SOPA, the major Internet Service Providers on the verge of implementing their "Six Strikes" plan to fight "online infringement".  With essentially no due process, AT&T, Cablevision Systems, Comcast, Time Warner Cable and Verizon will get on your case if you're accused of violating intellectual property rights -- and eventually even interfere with your ability to access the Internet.

August 26 2012

surveyork
13:36

TPP article 16.3 mandates a system of ISP liability that goes beyond the US Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) standards and US case law. In sum, the TPP pushes a framework beyond ACTA[1] and possibly the spirit of the DMCA, since it opens the doors for:

  • Three-strikes policies and laws that require Internet intermediaries to terminate their users’ Internet access on repeat allegations of copyright infringement
  • Requirements for Internet intermediaries to filter all Internet communications for potentially copyright-infringing material
  • ISP obligations to block access to websites that allegedly infringe or facilitate copyright infringement
  • Efforts to force intermediaries to disclose the identities of their customers to IP rightsholders on an allegation of copyright infringement.
surveyork
13:34
The Trans-Pacific Partnership is the son of ACTA, a secretive copyright and trade treaty being negotiated by the Pacific Rim nations, including the USA and Canada. As with ACTA, the secretive negotiation process means that the treaty's provisions represent an extremist corporate agenda where due process, privacy and free expression are tossed out the window in favor of streamlined copyright enforcement. If this passes, America will have a trade obligation to implement all the worst stuff in SOPA, and then some.

July 03 2012

surveyork
03:49
Tired of fighting bad bills like SOPA, PIPA and CISPA? Want to stand up against those who are trying to control what we do and say online? Let's do something different. Add your name below and join the global movement for Internet freedom. [What's this?]
FreePress.net | Declaration of Internet Freedom

May 22 2012

surveyork
20:42
While some attribute the Internet surveillance silence to an attempt to avoid picking sides in the high stakes privacy and security battle, documents obtained under the Access to Information Act offer a different, more troubling explanation. My weekly technology law column notes (Toronto Star version, homepage version) in the months leading up to the introduction Bill C-30, Canada's telecom companies worked actively with government officials to identify key issues and to develop a secret Industry - Government Collaborative Forum on Lawful Access.
Michael Geist - How Canada's Telecom Companies Have Secretly Supported Internet Surveillance Legislation

May 09 2012

surveyork
21:15

HM the Queen, in her first speech to the British Parliament in two years, announced albeit briefly the U.K. government’s plan to monitor all Web activity in the country.

It puts the U.K. en par with the United States, Russia, and China in how it monitors its citizens’ Web activity.

May 05 2012

surveyork
11:43
surveyork
11:09
Ricken Patel on the freedom of the web: 'We need to move from the defensive to the offensive' | Technology | guardian.co.uk
surveyork
11:02
CNET learns the FBI is quietly pushing its plan to force surveillance backdoors on social networks, VoIP, and Web e-mail providers, and that the bureau is asking Internet companies not to oppose a law making those backdoors mandatory.

May 04 2012

surveyork
12:21
Now, with CISPA, the clampdown on Internet freedom comes in the guise of a bill aimed at cyber terrorism that should give Internet entrepreneurs - and all business leaders - nightmares. And yet, this time, major Internet and technology companies, including Facebook and Microsoft, supported the bill, on the grounds that it would create a clear procedure for handling government requests for information. Microsoft, at least, belatedly dropped its support after recognising that the law would allow the US government to force any Internet business to hand over information about its users' online activities.

April 26 2012

surveyork
23:09
The problem with this sort of blank check "notwithstanding" clause is that even if the people who write the law have only good intentions, it provides substantial legal cover to others who might not. Given the amount of sharing that already takes place between corporations and government institutions, there's simply no need to give investigators the right to invade the privacy of any citizen at will--not when such a privilege could so obviously be abused.
surveyork
07:56

The US House will be voting on CISPA on Friday. With President Obama threatening to veto the bill if it reaches his desk unamended, the tech companies in support of this bill are becoming increasingly isolated. If we can peel them off, it's unlikely CISPA will pass unless radically altered.

The next 24 hours will be critical. Use the buttons to the right to email your friends and family, or to share on Twitter, Facebook,and Tumblr.

Reposted bycyberdemonskuxy
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