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June 13 2015

surveyork
14:32

"he sighed heavily, and explained that thousands of years ago, tribes of nomadic desert peoples made up God because, being incapable of scientific reasoning due to caveman-like existences, they had no other way of making sense of things like sunshine, rocks and pork-transmitted trichinosis.

“They made it all up, and they were ignorant, unwashed, half-naked pre-historic barbarians,” Leobald said. “So who are you gonna believe: Carl Sagan, and the pantheon of the world’s greatest scientific and intellectual minds, or some guy who measured wealth by how many goats he had?”

Sagan, according to Leobald, is an “astronomer” in a big city far, far away who writes what are known as “books.”

“I just felt like an idiot saying all that nonsense week in, week out. What’s the point of singing hymns of joyous adoration to a fictional entity?” Leobald said.

“Why convene to donate time, money and personal resources to a being which exists only in fabulous legends and mythological ancient texts? If we were to keep doing that, week after week, why, we’d feel ridiculous, wouldn’t we? Plus, we’d look pretty stupid as well. It’d be like talking to a wall, and frankly, I’ve got better things to do with my time. And I sincerely hope all of you do too.” "

November 14 2013

surveyork
23:55

November 09 2013

surveyork
09:03

July 31 2013

surveyork
09:12

"Earth's first portrait surfaced more than 20 years ago, courtesy of Voyager 1. In that historical shot from 1990, Earth figures as a “pale blue dot,” barely perceptible against a ray of scattering light (see below). In 1994, Carl Sagan, an experimenter for the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft, chatted with SciFri about first seeing that dot. “I thought, that’s us,” he said. “That’s our world. That’s all of us—everybody you know, everybody you love, everybody you ever heard of lived out their lives there, on a mote of dust in a sunbeam.” Listen to the conversation in the podcast below."

(via Carl Sagan Reflects on the Pale Blue Dot)

Carl Sagan Day

June 29 2013

surveyork
10:21
Play fullscreen
We Are Here: The Pale Blue Dot HD (read by Carl Sagan) - YouTube

March 16 2013

surveyork
07:22
Not only do we feel Carl Sagan deserves the recognition for his contributions to science, we believe sharing his vision and passion will help others understand the value and importance of science.

To:
Google Inc.
Create a Carl Sagan Google Doodle for November 9 (Carl Sagan Day).

Sincerely,
[Your name]

January 04 2013

surveyork
09:27

November 18 2012

surveyork
11:03

November 08 2012

surveyork
07:58

Carl Sagan Day - November 9

How can you celebrate Sagan Day?

Whether you’re an independent skeptics group, an astronomy club, a science department, a researcher, a teacher, a student, or just a really big Sagan fan, there are plenty of ways to celebrate Sagan Day:

  • Host a COSMOS marathon—all 13 episodes are available for free at hulu.com.
  • Check out Sagan’s many books at your local library or bookstore using the thorough listings from WorldCat.org.
  • Enjoy the special collection of articles by or about Sagan, previously published in Skeptical Inquirer magazine.
  • Listen to Sagan’s last public address for the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry (formerly CSICOP) as replayed on CFI’s podcast, Point of Inquiry: “Wonder and Skepticism.”
  • Listen to Ann Druyan, writer, producer, and widow of Sagan, discuss life with Carl, his outlook on life, and his famous Gifford Lectures, “The Varieties of Scientific Experience,” also on Point of Inquiry.
  • Host your own apple pie baking contest (from scratch, of course).
  • Dress like Carl for a day!
  • Refresh your skeptic skills with a review of Sagan’s Baloney Detection Kit.
  • Invite your friends over and try to convince them you have a dragon in your garage.
  • Take in a star show at your local planetarium.
  • Snag a pair of these gorgeous Pale Blue Dot earrings and coasters from Surly Amy!
  • Learn everything there is to know about Voyager 1 and 2.
  • Remember how thrilled you were when you saw the first stunning images from Voyager and go revel in these gorgeous NASA Voyager galleries.
  • See where the Voyager probes are now! (Yes, incredibly, they are still working and sending back data from over 15 billion kilometers away.)
  • At the very least, seek out a dark sky, look UP, and reconnect with the grandeur of the cosmos.
surveyork
07:05

October 12 2012

surveyork
12:22

July 28 2012

surveyork
23:52
Play fullscreen
Cosmos: A Three-Movement Choral Suite [Carl Sagan Tribute Series] - YouTube
Reposted bypsiphisamurai psiphisamurai

June 15 2011

surveyork
19:01
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