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February 21 2014

surveyork
16:15
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October 15 2013

surveyork
20:26
UNBELIEVABLE: Pro-surveillance Senators are trying to revive CISPA. Again! We've killed it twice before, we can do it again.

They really don't get it. 

Again and again the anti-privacy goons in Congress have circled the wagons to try and pass their favorite bill -- CISPA -- and again and again, we have completely shut them down. 

And yet, they're trying it again. Senators Diane Feinstein and Saxby Chambliss, leaders of the Senate Intelligence Committee and staunch defenders of the NSA mass surveillance, say they are "very close" to introducing a Senate version of CISPA.

CISPA would grant legal immunity to corporations who share your data with the NSA -- sign to the right to tell your Senators: NO CISPA.

August 09 2013

surveyork
21:40
Network security agreements that Reliance Communications and VSNL signed with U.S. government departments oblige them to share data carried on their infrastructure and assist the U.S. in its surveillance programme.
By SAGNIK DUTTA in New Delhi
surveyork
21:30

A serious flaw in the security of Google's Chrome browser lets anyone with access to a user's computer see all the passwords stored for email, social media and other sites, directly from the settings panel. No password is needed to view them.

Besides personal accounts, sensitive company login details would be compromised if someone who used Chrome left their computer unattended with the screen active.

July 24 2013

surveyork
22:15

The U.S. government has attempted to obtain the master encryption keys that Internet companies use to shield millions of users' private Web communications from eavesdropping.

These demands for master encryption keys, which have not been disclosed previously, represent a technological escalation in the clandestine methods that the FBI and the National Security Agency employ when conducting electronic surveillance against Internet users.

If the government obtains a company's master encryption key, agents could decrypt the contents of communications intercepted through a wiretap or by invoking the potent surveillance authorities of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. Web encryption -- which often appears in a browser with a HTTPS lock icon when enabled -- uses a technique called SSL, or Secure Sockets Layer.

"The government is definitely demanding SSL keys from providers," said one person who has responded to government attempts to obtain encryption keys.

March 09 2013

surveyork
10:32

Flaw in Chrome, Safari, IE and Opera Exploited to Fill Disks with Pictures of Cats


It turns out that Firefox is not affected because Mozilla’ implementation of localStorage “smarter.”

February 13 2013

surveyork
00:54

January 27 2013

surveyork
05:00

Full Group Policy lockdown and enforcement is available right now for all versions (current and future) of Firefox

January 17 2013

surveyork
15:49

Overview

Flash proxies are a new way of providing access to a censorship circumvention system such as Tor. A  is a miniature proxy that runs in a web browser. It checks for clients that need access, then conveys data between them and a Tor relay.

Tor has bridge relays, but in some cases even these can be blocked despite the fact that their addresses are handed out only a few at a time. The purpose of this project is to create many, generally ephemeral bridge IP addresses, with the goal of outpacing a censor's ability to block them. Rather than increasing the number of bridges at static addresses, we aim to make existing bridges reachable by a larger and changing pool of addresses.

"Flash proxy" is a name that should make you think "quick" and "short-lived." Our implementation uses standard web technologies: JavaScript and WebSocket. (In the long-ago past we used Adobe Flash, but do not any longer.)

If your browser runs JavaScript and has support for WebSockets then while you are viewing this page your browser is a potential proxy available to help censored Internet users.

How to Put the Badge on Your Web Page

Copy and paste this HTML into your page. An example is at the bottom of this page.

<iframe src="//crypto.stanford.edu/flashproxy/embed.html" width="80" height="15" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe>
Flash Proxies

December 16 2012

surveyork
15:20
The world’s governments just concluded the World Conference on International Telecommunications (WCIT) where they updated the International Telecommunication Regulations (ITRs), a binding international treaty on telecommunications provision and interoperability. In the end, the government-controlled conference produced a text that crossed red lines for several states, from both the developed and developing world, who have said they will either not sign or need to consult their capitals. Still, many of the most problematic proposals failed to make it into the final draft.

November 30 2012

surveyork
09:22

Pledge your support for the free and open Internet:

“A free and open world depends on a free and open Internet. Governments alone, working behind closed doors, should not direct its future. The billions of people around the globe who use the Internet should have a voice.”

November 29 2012

surveyork
21:07

On December 3rd, the world’s governments will meet to update a key treaty of a UN agency called the International Telecommunication Union (ITU). Some governments are proposing to extend ITU authority to Internet governance in ways that could threaten Internet openness and innovation, increase access costs, and erode human rights online.
We call on civil society organizations and citizens of all nations to sign the following Statement to Protect Global Internet Freedom:

 

Internet governance decisions should be made in a transparent manner with genuine multistakeholder participation from civil society, governments, and the private sector. We call on the ITU and its member states to embrace transparency and reject any proposals that might expand ITU authority to areas of Internet governance that threaten the exercise of human rights online.

Protect Global Internet Freedom | Protect Global Internet Freedom

November 17 2012

surveyork
10:28
At least five pornographic websites are among Egypt’s 100 most frequently visited online destinations this year, according to Alexa, a division of Amazon.com that tracks online traffic patterns globally.
Reposted byfrittatensuppe frittatensuppe

November 15 2012

surveyork
21:50

There’s a meeting between the world’s governments in a just a few weeks, and it could very well decide the future of the internet through a binding international treaty. It’s called the World Conference on International Telecommunications (WCIT), and it’s being organized by a government-controlled UN agency called the International Telecommunication Union (ITU).

If some proposals at WCIT are approved, decisions about the internet would be made by a top-down, old-school government-centric agency behind closed doors. Some proposals allow for access to be cut off more easily, threaten privacy, legitimize monitoring and blocking online traffic. Others seek to impose new fees for accessing content, not to mention slowing down connection speeds. If the delicate balance of the internet is upset, it could have grave consequences for businesses and human rights.

How the ITU could put the Internet behind closed doors.
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