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October 02 2014

surveyork
18:07

the U.S. Department of Commerce dumped another set of documents as a result of our request. One particular email from the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) — highlighted earlier this morning in Der Spiegel — caught our attention. It reveals how the Home Affairs department of the European Commission (DG Home) has been working alongside the U.S. administration during the early stages of the privacy reform effort.

The email is between staff working at the NTIA of the Department of Commerce. The email makes reference to the drafting of one of the lobby documents the Obama administration produced to influence the outcome of the data protection reform package (read EDRi’s analysis on the paper here). This is one of the many documents which likely contributed to a diluting of the Data Protection Regulation even before the proposal had been made public.

The email indicates that Commissioner Malmström and/or her cabinet had been sharing information with the U.S. Mission in the E.U., including appropriate times to publish the lobby document, information about internal politics within the Commission, and concerns about how the proposal for a Data Protection Directive could conflict with E.U. and U.S. Law Enforcement interests. In short, DG Home has been actively working to undermine a crucial reform for E.U. citizens’ fundamental rights to privacy and data protection.

For many who have been following the E.U. privacy reform debate closely, this trans-Atlantic cooperation was an open secret. However, until now, it has not been possible to demonstrate DG Home’s maneuvers. Beyond the implications for the Data Protection Reform, the contents of the acquired document give cause for concern about Ms. Malmström’s suitability for leading EU negotiations with the USA on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), given that she has recently been chosen E.U. Commissioner-designate for Trade.

September 15 2014

surveyork
08:56
AUCKLAND, New Zealand—The New Zealand spy agency, the Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB), worked in 2012 and 2013 to implement a mass metadata surveillance system even as top government officials publicly insisted no such program was being planned and would not be legally permitted.

August 23 2014

surveyork
23:18

July 15 2014

surveyork
13:02
surveyork
12:45
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